LTB Orders

Landlord Self Help Centre
Landlord Self Help Centre
LTB Orders
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Landlord and Tenant Board Orders

Transcript

Introduction

Welcome to Landlord’s Self-Help Centre’s module about Landlord and Tenant Board orders. The information offered in this presentation is intended as general information, it is not legal advice. If you need more information, please contact a legal service provider.

Residential Tenancies Act, 2006

In Ontario, the Residential Tenancies Act is the provincial law that governs most residential rental agreements. It defines the rights and responsibilities of both landlords and tenants and outlines appropriate reasons for giving a notice of termination. It also establishes rules and framework for the adjudicators and Landlord and Tenant Board procedures.

COVID-19

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Landlord and Tenant Board offices are closed for in person hearings. As a result, hearings are being conducted in electronic and written formats. Because of the backlog, Landlord and Tenant Board orders may take longer to be issued.

Types of Orders Issued

Orders can be issued by the Landlord and Tenant Board in multiple formats, such as interim orders, ex parte orders, hearing orders and consent orders. For more information about the different types of orders, visit the Landlord and Tenant Board’s website.

How LTB Order can be Voided

In some cases, the Landlord and Tenant Board Order can be voided. The most common case involves arrears of rent. If the arrears are paid, in full, to the landlord by a date specified in the order, the tenant can motion the Board to cancel the eviction.

How to Enforce a LTB Order

If the tenants do not void the Landlord and Tenant Board order or move out of the rental unit by the specified date, the next step is to file for eviction with the Court Enforcement Office (also known as the Sheriff’s office). 

Amendments and Reviews

A Request to Amend an Order can be filed with the Landlord and Tenant Board to correct clerical mistakes, such as a calculation errors. While a Request to Review can be filed with the Landlord and Tenant Board if a “serious error” has been made with the final order.  Both of these requests must be filed no later than 30 days after the date of the original order. Refer to the Interpretation Guidelines on the Landlord and Tenant Board website for more information.

Appeals

Appeals of Landlord and Tenant Board Orders are made in Divisional Court, a branch of the Superior Court of Justice.  More information can be found on the Attorney General’s website provided.

Request to Re-open

A Request to re-open an application can be filed if a party did not meet the terms of a Landlord and Tenant Board mediated agreement, or if one of the parties was misled.

Conclusion

Thank you for watching this module about Landlord and Tenant Board orders. The information offered in this presentation is intended as general information, it is not legal advice. If you have a specific issue or situation, please contact a legal service provider.

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