FAQ Categories

The landlord is responsible for providing and maintaining the rental unit in a good state of repair and fit for habitation and in compliance with health, safety and housing standards. It does not matter if the tenant was aware of the state of non-repair before they entered into the tenancy agreement. If a landlord does not maintain the property, the tenant can file an application with the Landlord and Tenant Board for an order to have the repairs done as well as an abatement of rent and reimbursement for any repairs they have done themselves. Although the Residential Tenancies Act does not permit a tenant to withhold rent because of maintenance issues, many tenants will do this to encourage the Landlord to bring a non-payment of rent application to the Board at which time the tenant can bring up the maintenance issues.

It is not advisable to enter into such an agreement. It is the landlord’s responsibility to maintain the property and ensure that it is in a good state of repair, the landlord cannot pass on that responsibility to the tenant. If they move in under these conditions and then decide against doing the work you would still be obligated to do it and they can claim an abatement of rent based on the unit not being in a good state of repair.

You may still be required to repair the air conditioner if it was in the rental unit when the new tenant moved in. Although there may have been no mention of providing air conditioning in your Tenancy Agreement, once the tenant began using the existing air conditioner it became an implied agreement that the air conditioner is provided and therefore you are responsible to maintain it.

The Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 states that maintenance issues are the responsibility of the landlord. Therefore, your issue is one which involves contract law and we do not advise in this area. You may wish to seek the advice of a lawyer or paralegal.

Dealing with mould issues in a rental property can be a bit challenging, and it doesn’t help that the law does not set out clear guidelines on how to deal with this type of situation. The first step for you would be to meet with your tenants and try to come up with a plan on how to deal with the problem. If they have to move out temporarily while you get the problem corrected, you should offer them a rent rebate for the time that they’re out of the unit, or offer to pay for their accommodation costs. It is really up to both parties to work something out. If they chose to move out instead and terminate their tenancy, then you should both sign an Agreement to Terminate the Tenancy which is a Form N11, this form can be obtained from the Landlord and Tenant Board’s website at www.ltb.gov.on.ca

The Residential Tenancies Act, Section 20 states that “a landlord is responsible for providing and maintaining a residential complex, including the rental units in it, in a good state of repair and fit for habitation and for complying with health, safety, housing and maintenance standards.” When it comes to any kind of pest infestation in a rental unit, it is the landlord’s responsibility to deal with the problem.

We only deal with residential tenancies and therefore cannot advise on commercial rental properties. There is a department of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing where you can obtain general information on commercial tenancies, call 416-585-7373 or toll-free at 1-800-729-4871.

The landlord is responsible for maintaining the property which includes clearing the snow and mowing the lawn. If a tenant agrees to do these tasks, the tasks should be clearly laid out in the tenancy agreement. In the event that the tenant fails to live up to the terms of the agreement, it is ultimately the responsibility of the property owner.

This is an issue that is not really addressed in the Residential Tenancies Act. It is usually up to the landlord and the tenant to work out an agreement at the beginning of the tenancy on how the garbage and recyclable items will be collected. If there is nothing in your tenancy agreement about it, you can try taking the position that all other tenants in the building take out their own garbage and it’s understood that would apply to her also. However, if she is insisting to charge you for it, your only recourse would be to take the matter to the Landlord and Tenant Board for a decision.

When it comes to snow removal, this is usually part of the landlord’s maintenance obligations. It’s the landlord’s responsibility to ensure that the rental property complies with any health, safety, housing and maintenance standards, is kept in a good state of repair, and is fit for habitation. In some cases, tenants might agree to take on this task. If this is the case, it should be clearly stated in the tenancy agreement. However, if they don’t comply, it can be difficult for landlords to enforce and the landlord may still be held responsible. If the municipality gets involved, they will order the property owner to take care of the problem, not the tenant.

Most tenants will usually do it themselves; however, the Act states that tenants are only responsible for ordinary cleanliness of the unit. Therefore, this would fall under the landlord’s maintenance obligations.

Section 20 of the Residential Tenancies Act states that “a landlord is responsible for providing and maintaining a residential complex, including the rental units in it, in a good state of repair and fit for habitation and for complying with health, safety, housing and maintenance standards.” The landlord can only hold the tenant responsible if the landlord can prove that the tenant is the one that has caused the problem. If it can’t be proven then the landlord has to pay the cost to repair.